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Ajaia ajaja  Roseate Spoonbill
Louisiana's spoonbills seem to have expanded their range eastward and northward in recent years. The northernmost and easternmost records of these branch-nesting and colonial birds were new records in 1995 and 1996 in their respective areas. A spoonbill sweeps its bill through water, snapping it shut on insects, fish, and crustaceans that are detected by touch.

photos Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller 
male or female (main photo); immature (inset left)

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Dendrocygna autumnalis  Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
Many of these tropical granivores were raised and released at refuges in southwestern Louisiana. They may nest colonially on the ground or in tree cavities and are thought to be expanding from Texas and the Louisiana introduction sites.

inset (left) Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 
main photo Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller 
female or male

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Dendrocygna bicolor  Fulvous Whistling-Duck
This species has invaded Louisiana in large numbers from 1916 onward. The first authentic breeding record was obtained in 1939. These ground-nesting and granivorous ducks show a propensity for rice fields, although they also breed in coastal marshes. The Atlas record in West Carroll Parish was from a rice field. The ducks seem to be expanding their population and range in Louisiana.

main photo Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller  at Audubon Zoo, New Orleans
inset (top) Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller