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Cathartes aura  Turkey Vulture
These cavity-nesting and ground-nesting carrion scavengers probably breed throughout the state where sufficient forest cover occurs. The numerous "Possible" records, when compared with the Black Vulture, reflects the fact that a safe-date period was designated for Black but not for Turkey vultures. It also reflects the difficulty of finding vulture nests.

photos Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller 
male or female (left) and immature (inset right)

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Coragyps atratus  Black Vulture
The absence of these somewhat colonial, cavity-nesting and ground-nesting carrion scavengers in the northeastern corner of the state (such as East Carroll Parish) reflects the nearly complete conversion of that area to cropland. Both Black and Turkey vultures have been jeopardized by eggshell thinning resulting from persistent pesticides in carcasses.

photos Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller 
female(s) or male(s)

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Haliaeetus leucocephalus  Bald Eagle
This, the national bird of the United States, was Federally-listed as an endangered species from 1967 to 1995. The U.S. ban on the pesticide DDT in 1972 helped return these piscivores (and carrion scavengers) to wetlands nationwide. In 1999, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service delisted the Bald Eagle from threatened status. The "Confirmed" quads were catalogued by the Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife & Fisheries. In 1995, there were 105 eagle nests in Louisiana, all in trees.

adult and juvenile on nest (lower)photo Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen
upper photo Louisiana Natural Heritage Program