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Otus asio  Eastern Screech-Owl
These urban-tolerant songbird carnivores are very widely distributed in Louisiana. This screech-owl is one of at least eight species of Louisiana birds that adopted old nests of the formerly common Red-cockaded Woodpecker.

painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
red and gray morphs; male(s) or females(s)

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Caprimulgus carolinensis  Chuck-will's-widow
These nightjars occur almost strictly in the uplands. They are quite uncommon in the Florida Parishes. As with owls, the Atlas records of these ground-nesting birds probably under represent their numbers, because they sing at night and may have been missed by some atlasers. Although generally insectivorous, "chucks" can swallow small songbirds whole. The Chuck-will's-widow is on the Audubon WatchList for North America.

painted by John James Audubon in 1822 (painting was reversed to fit the bird beside the map)
female (male has white in outer tail feathers)

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Chordeiles minor  Common Nighthawk
This, Louisiana's other nesting nightjar, seems to occur most frequently in southern Louisiana. These ground-nesting insectivores use a variety of habitats, from barrier islands and burned-over lands to urban rooftops. They are relatively late spring migrants, and so the "Possible" records may represent nonbreeding birds passing through.

photo Copyright 1999 by Gayle Strickland&
painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
males (female's throat is buff; no white in tail)