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Vireo gilvus  Warbling Vireo
All of the Atlas records of these branch-nesting insectivores are from batture (levee) forest along the Red and Mississippi rivers. The woodlands where Warbling Vireos were found consisted primarily of willow (Salix sp.) and cottonwoods (Populus deltoides). Harry C. Oberholser reported (1938) that these vireos were rare but widespread in all but coastal Louisiana.

painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
female or male (upper) and juvenile (lower)

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Vireo bellii  Bell's Vireo
Louisiana atlasers found only one quad, that being in Claiborne Parish, harboring these insectivores. Historically these vireos of dense, wetland thickets have been known to breed rarely in Louisiana from Monroe to Shreveport. The Bell's Vireo is a frequent host of cowbirds and on the Audubon WatchList for North America.

photo Copyright 1999 by Dan Lane 
male or female (seeing this species can be very difficult)

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Protonotaria citrea  Prothonotary Warbler
These common insectivores breed in forests of bottomlands and small river floodplains throughout the state, down into the Coastal Marsh Region. There seem to be fewer Atlas records in the pine lands, where bottomlands are smaller. As the only warblers in the eastern U.S. to nest in cavities, they readily accept woodpecker holes and nest boxes. The species is on the Audubon WatchList for North America.

lower male Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller 
female at nest and male (upper) comprising
two photos Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen