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Parula americana  Northern Parula
These branch-nesting insectivores breed in broad-leaved forests throughout the state, especially where they can find Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) for a nesting site, which, in the pine lands, is usually along bayous and rivers. Because of the Parula's extended migration period, some "Possible" records may represent nonbreeding migrants. This species is on the Audubon WatchList for Louisiana.

painting with male (upper) and female by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
female and young in moss nest, Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 

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Mniotilta varia  Black-and-white Warbler
This species breeds uncommonly in the Pine Region west of Hammond and parts of the Mississippi/Red River Region, with most Atlas records north of Alexandria. Black-and-whites favor dry, broad-leaved forests or piney woods mixed with many broad-leaved trees. These ground-nesters can breed early because they forage on bark insects whose microhabitat offers shelter from cool air.

painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
male (left) and female (right)

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Dendroica dominica  Yellow-throated Warbler
These branch-nesting insectivores breed statewide, though primarily in baldcypress trees in swamps and along streams. They forage high in tall pines and broad-leaved trees, moving along limbs and searching under bark rather like Black-and-white Warblers. They have the longest bills in the wood warbler family. In 1994, one atlaser found a hybrid Yellow-throated Warbler x Northern Parula, once known as Sutton's Warbler.

Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller 
photos of two males (female is slightly duller)