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Dendroica discolor  Prairie Warbler
In Louisiana, these partly colonial, shrub-nesting insectivores are birds of early-stage pine stands (trees roughly 3-8 years old). Frequent and widespread replanting of pines perpetuates the coincidence of the Prairie Warbler distribution with that of the Pine Region. Population declines, owing in part to Brown-headed Cowbirds in cutover pine lands, have prompted the inclusion of this warbler on the Audubon WatchList for North America.

painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
male (upper) and female (lower)

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Dendroica pinus  Pine Warbler
The breeding distribution of these urban-tolerant and branch-nesting insectivores closely matches the full extent of the Pine Region. They are abundant in Louisiana and use older pines than do Prairie Warblers. The Pine Warbler is one of several species of birds that can defeat cowbird parasitism by adding nest material that buries the foreign eggs.

two photos Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 
female (upper) and male (lower)

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Oporornis formosus  Kentucky Warbler
These ground-nesting insectivores are very common in Louisiana. Kentucky Warblers breed in broad-leaved thickets within most woodlands north of the Coastal Marsh Region. In the Pine Region, they are found usually in the narrow thickets along streams. The Kentucky Warbler is included on the Audubon WatchList for North America and is a frequent host of cowbirds.

painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
male (left) and female (right)