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Wilsonia citrina  Hooded Warbler
These shrub-nesting birds are abundant in Louisiana forests. Their distribution is similar to that of Kentucky Warblers, although their breeding range extends farther south into the Coastal Marsh Region. During the breeding season, females forage on the ground while males sally for flying insects, reducing their competition for food. The Hooded Warbler is a frequent host of cowbirds and is included on the Audubon WatchList for Louisiana.

painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
male (left) and female (right)

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Helmitheros vermivorus  Worm-eating Warbler
These seemingly scarce insectivores breed widely in the uplands. They nest in hilly, broad-leaved forests and, to an unknown extent, in dense pine plantations (trees roughly 10-15 years old) mixed with sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) and other hardwoods. They feed not on earthworms but rather on the insects hiding in dead leaves, in living foliage, under bark, and in leaf litter. The Worm-eating Warbler is on the Audubon WatchList for North America.

photo Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 
female or male bathing

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Limnothlypis swainsonii  Swainson's Warbler
These partly colonial insectivores breed in dense thickets and vine tents in forests north of the Coastal Marsh Region. They build large nests in cane, shrubs, and vines. In the Pine Region, they breed in the narrow thickets along streams, even deep within pine plantations. They may be more common than the map suggests, because they are generally detected only by their song. The Swainson's Warbler is on the Audubon WatchList for North America.

photo Copyright 1999 by Dan Lane 
male (as suggested by singing)