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Passerina cyanea  Indigo Bunting
These branch-nesting insectivores and granivores are common and widespread in shrub habitats and in forest openings north of the Coastal Marsh Region. The "Possible" records, especially those from coastal areas, may represent migrants and nonbreeding birds. The Indigo Bunting is a frequent host of the Brown-headed Cowbird.

two photos Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 
male (left) and female (right)

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Passerina ciris  Painted Bunting
Although seen by few, Painted Buntings are nearly as widespread as Indigos. These branch-nesting granivores favor broad-leaved woodlands adjacent to marshes and fields. Such habitat is scarce in Winn and Jackson parishes but common on coastal spoil banks and cheniers. As a result, Painteds are more common than Indigos in Cameron Parish and elsewhere along the coast. Painted Buntings are on the Audubon WatchList for North America.

male (right) Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 
female (left) Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller 

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Spiza americana  Dickcissel
These grass-nesting insectivores and granivores prefer large fields of grains or weeds over the expanses of soybean and cotton cultivation used by Horned Larks. They occur throughout the Prairie/Rice Field and Mississippi/Red River regions, except for the sugar cane fields of southern Louisiana. In cropped areas, they nest in the weedy rows along drainage and irrigation canals. The Dickcissel is on the Audubon WatchList for North America.

left photo Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller&
right photo Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 
males (female lacks black on the throat)