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Piranga rubra  Summer Tanager
Summer Tanagers are renowned for preying on stinging insects and their larvae, sometimes becoming a nuisance at beehives. Much of their breeding biology is poorly known. These branch-nesting insectivores breed very commonly throughout the Mississippi/Red River, Pine, and Prairie/Rice Field regions. Their breeding range extends almost to the coast on the tongue of higher ground south of Lafayette.

photos Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 
female (left) and male (right)

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Piranga olivacea  Scarlet Tanager
These branch-nesting insectivores breed commonly in broad-leaved forests as far south as central Arkansas. One pair was recorded in June and July of 1995 and 1996 (and 1997) at a single site in Union Parish, although no nest was found. This Atlas record represents the first evidence of their breeding in Louisiana.

painting by Louis Agassiz Fuertes 1914
female (left), male (middle), and male in molt

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Passer domesticus  House Sparrow
People first introduced House Sparrows into North America from Europe at Brooklyn, New York, in 1850. The species spread across most of the United States by 1900. These somewhat colonial, cavity-nesting granivores now breed in urban areas and around farms throughout Louisiana. They are aggressive birds, often commandeering the nests of swallows, bluebirds, and other songbirds.

male Copyright 1999 by Bill Bergen 
female Copyright 1999 by Brian Miller 
male (left) and female (right)